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My New Year Resolution: To Help YOU Complete Your First Sportive

Ride your first sportive

In the UK we are being torn apart by storms of biblical proportions. In the US, the Midwest is dealing with a ‘polar vortex’ (definition: a lot of snow).

It seems appropriate, therefore, that my attention turns to bike riding. Bike riding of a sportive nature.

Specifically, my thoughts have turned to how I am going to help you (yes, YOU!) prepare for and complete your first sportive.

(If you’ve already done a sportive, I’ll help you with your next (harder! faster! longer!) sportive).

And how am I going to do that, you ask (anxiously). Read on Macfroomedog*…

(* which started as a Shakespearean reference and turned into a new item on the McDonald’s menu…)

Focus On Sportive Preparation And Advice

My posts on this ‘ere blog will be focused on helping beginner and recreational riders prepare for and complete their first major sportive.

For some, the first ‘major’ sportive will be their first sportive, full-stop (period).

Others may have completed the odd shorter course sportive, but are now looking to step up to a more substantial challenge: a first 100-mile ‘century’ ride (e.g. the RideLondon 100) or one of the tough ‘climby’ sportives (e.g. the Etape du Tour, the Wiggle Dragon Ride).

I know this may come as a disappointment for some of you, but I’m unlikely to be posting any more ‘how to’ guides on the fitting of esoteric Trek-only bike components. Sorry.

I’m Working On My First ‘Grimpeur Guide’

Last year I wrote a free ebook, the subtly-titled, “4 Steps To Your First Long Distance Sportive”. It seemed to go down well with people.

By next opus will have a similar overall aim, but will be laser-targeted towards helping the beginner cyclist go from zero experience on a bike (not counting childhood) through to completing that first sportive ride. And not just completing it, but doing so with style, grace and not a little enjoyment.

If you’re that beginner cyclist, perhaps with your name in the hat for a RideLondon place (or you already have a charity place), then this will hopefully be right up your strasse.

(Incidentally, if you haven’t already got hold of my free ebook for subscribers, either bang your email address in the box at the side or bottom of this post, or follow this link).

In The Meantime

Whilst you’re waiting for all of that (with baited breath I’d imagine), I’ve collected together some of the posts over the past year that novice sportive riders will find helpful, particularly if you’re hoping to participate in this year’s RideLondon. Do give them a read, they’re really good….

Useful general sportive posts:

Sportive Bike vs Road Bike – What Is The Difference?

Where To Find Cycling Training Plan Information

How To Choose Your Next Sportive (And Actually Complete It)

Bike Gears: How Do They Work

Bicycle Insurance: What You Need To Know

MapMyRide vs Strava: A Detailed Comparison

Specific information on the RideLondon route and (importantly) the climbs:

RideLondon 100 Route Analysis Redux: The Five Things You Need To Know

The Grimpeur analyses the RideLondon 100 route

Leith Hill Cycling: Gradient, Elevation And All That Fandango

Box Hill Cycling: Gradient, Elevation and Length of the Surrey Alpe

Finally, A Reminder

If you’ve not already done it, do sign up to the Grimpeur Heureux email list. You’ll be the first to hear about news on my new ‘Grimpeur Guide’ (there may be the odd sneak preview). You’ll also get the much-lauded (by me) free e-book: ‘4 Steps To Your First Long Distance Sportive’


Photo credit: http://www.flickr.com/people/52408222@N08/

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{ 3 comments… add one }
  • Kris says:

    Don’t even remember how I came across your blog, but it was after I finished 2013 Etape du Tour, and only did one charity ride (80Km) before (you really don’t want to know what my all year/all weather/all purpose training bike is). Did my own research and I’m not a pro in any sense but did my homework spending hours researching “stuff” on internet.

    Looking forward to read more suggestions (only to see if I missed something hehe)

    You really give sensible advice, but I would prefer and suggest to come up with a specific problem-solution, simplified real example. When I was looking for stuff I did not want to follow instructions like a Bible, but to get the thinking behind it and wasn’t afraid to get some things wrong (and I did it all rather well, Etape was awesome).

    Good blog, and amusing reading 🙂
    Keep them coming.
    Kris

    • Thanks Kris. Great feedback. I’ll definitely work hard to show the reasoning behind any advice, so that readers can make up their own minds on how to implement it. Good luck with your continued cycling success!

  • Kris January 12, 2014, 3:24 pm

    Don’t even remember how I came across your blog, but it was after I finished 2013 Etape du Tour, and only did one charity ride (80Km) before (you really don’t want to know what my all year/all weather/all purpose training bike is). Did my own research and I’m not a pro in any sense but did my homework spending hours researching “stuff” on internet.

    Looking forward to read more suggestions (only to see if I missed something hehe)

    You really give sensible advice, but I would prefer and suggest to come up with a specific problem-solution, simplified real example. When I was looking for stuff I did not want to follow instructions like a Bible, but to get the thinking behind it and wasn’t afraid to get some things wrong (and I did it all rather well, Etape was awesome).

    Good blog, and amusing reading 🙂
    Keep them coming.
    Kris

    • Andrew Montgomery January 14, 2014, 3:34 pm

      Thanks Kris. Great feedback. I’ll definitely work hard to show the reasoning behind any advice, so that readers can make up their own minds on how to implement it. Good luck with your continued cycling success!

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